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Salty Sam’s Fun Blog for Children

Post Number 28

Shipping

 

 Hello Everyone

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ln my last post, l told you about lifeboats. But there are lots of different kinds of ships on the sea. l see lots of different kinds of boats go past my lighthouse.

 

Until about 170 years ago all ships had oars or sails. Early ships had only one mast and sail, but later they had many and each sail had a different name.

 

When the steam engine was invented, ships didn’t have to wait for the wind to move them anymore; they could move under their own power. There were steam ships as well as steam trains.

 

Ships today are giants compared to those first ships. Even though those boats were so tiny, people were brave enough to go right across the Atlantic in them. They rowed across with just help from the wind in a sail. People called Vikings from Scandinavia and also the first settlers that went to America did this.

 

The ships today are safer and more comfortable. The most comfortable are the cruise liners that are like floating hotels. They even have swimming pools on them.

 

The largest ships are super tankers that carry oil and take about a mile to stop in the water because they are so big and heavy.

 

The fastest are the catamarans and hydrofoils. They can go so fast because they have most of their body or ‘hull’ out of the water.

 

l see lots of sailing boats around here. They don’t go very fast but holiday makers like to relax on them so it doesn’t matter.

 

When people on holiday want some excitement and want to go fast they can use a jet ski.

 

People don’t want to go out too far from the shore on jet skis but they mustn’t go too close to the beach either because it would be dangerous. There could be people swimming near the beach and they wouldn’t want to hit anyone. When people are swimming they are not very easily seen because only their heads are showing above the water. So it is best for jet skiers to keep away.

 

Boats travel in knots, not miles an hour like cars. One knot is one nautical mile an hour. A nautical mile at sea is longer than a mile on land.

 

A nautical mile is a fraction of a degree of the World’s circumference. ln fact it is a 60th of a degree. (This measurement is actually called a ‘minute’ but is nothing to do with time.)

 

There are 360 degrees in a circle. This means there are 21,600 nautical miles around the World.

 

A knot is called a knot because in the olden days when ships wanted to know how fast they were travelling sailors tied knots in a piece of thin rope at regular intervals, then counted how many went through their hands or over the back of the boat in a given space of time as the boat travelled along.

 

lf l go to Rocky Bay in my little motor boat, l have a speedometer to tell me how fast l am going. Really modern boats have GPS. (These initials stand for Global Positioning System.)

 

l’ll talk to you soon.

 

 

Bye bye everyone – don’t forget to subscribe to my blog!

 

Love and kisses

 

 

Salty Sam

heartwww.christina-sinclair.comimage007

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Bill and Bob’s Joke of the Weekjokejoke

 

Bob: What do sea monsters eat?

 

Bill: l don’t know. What do sea monsters eat?

 

Bob: Fish and ships!

 
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Salty Sam © Christina Sinclair 2008

Unauthorized use and/or duplication of material from this blog without express and written permission from this blog’s author and owner is strictly prohibited.

Links may be used to www.christina-sinclair.com

 

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Picture Gallery

 
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A Viking ship 

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A model of a ship taking 17th century settlers to the first permanent settlement in Virginia 

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An 18th century frigate – frigates were known as the ‘eyes and ears’ of the fleet

The soldiers on board were called marines – we still have marines today

Visiting places to find out information is known as reconnaissance work 

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A clipper was a 19th century ship built for speed and carried goods 

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A steamship 

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A cruise liner 

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A jet ski 

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An oil tanker 

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A catamaran

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A hydrofoil 

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This Solar powered catamaran developed by the University of Geneva only needs a crew of four to operate it

(Getty Press) 

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The ‘Solar Shuttle’ in Hyde Park also runs on solar power 

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There are solar panels on the roof 

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Boats for hire for families in Hyde Park

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Boats for hire on the River Thames 

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A tall sailing ship 

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A steam ship with funnels 

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A Thames barge with tremendous pulling power 

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A Thames barge pulling two loads of containers 

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Thames pleasure craft 

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A place to party

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HMS Belfast is a 20th century warship that is moored by Tower Bridge

It is open to the public

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An old Thames barge 

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A pleasure cruise on a warm sunny afternoon 

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Shipyard capstan from around 1865

Capstan bars would be inserted into the shafts and men would push on the bars to wind a ship’s rope onto the capstan 

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Ship’s ropes in an old ship’s chandler (a shop selling things for ships) 

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An enormous ship’s propeller

(National Maritime Museum)

 

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A ship’s anchor 

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Anchors are dropped into the water at the front of the ship

 

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    desk  THE SALTY SAM NEWS DESKlamp

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My nephews Bill and Bob just love boats. It is just as well really when we are all living in a seaside community.

This week I was teaching them some boating terms.

Being an old seadog myself, of course I am the perfect person to do this! smile1 (2)

Do you know any words that have to do with boats?

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There are some words we use to describe parts of a boat that are different from parts of a house – do you know what all of these words mean?

 

  1. cabin
  2. galley
  3. bow
  4. stern
  5. hull
  6. deck
  7. saloon
  8. bunk
  9. berth
  10. poop image073

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If you would like to learn more about rescues at sea, click on the following link to watch a cartoon about vessel triage. The cartoon is actually for adults but I think you will find it interesting.

Vessel is another name for a ship and triage means a system of deciding what the most important things to focus on are in an emergency. That is to say what you should do first and then what you should do second and so on.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ckkv7o5G5L8

 
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I have had a lot of people visiting my blog this week – so thank you everyone for spreading the word!

 

 

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crafty tip

Crafty Tip

 
lf you have a pair of sunglasses or a small camera in a pouch that is quite thin, this is a pattern for a knitted pouch that will give them a little more protection when they are in your holiday bag!

 

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lt is a really easy pattern for a beginner to knit. (Of course if you have not learnt to purl yet, you could try making it in garter stitch.)

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SUNGLASSES CASE (KNlT TWO)

Using 4mm knitting needles and blue dk yarn cast on 25 stitches

Stocking stitch 46 rows (change colour at the beginning of row 46, if you want a contrasting colour at the top)

Purl 2 rows, knit 6 rows (54 rows)

Cast off

 

Make another side in exactly the same way.

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TlP

You can use some tweedy yarn or rainbow yarn to make the pouch look more interesting, but if you want to put a boat motif on one side, it is better to use a light-coloured, plain yarn otherwise it is difficult to see what you are doing when you Swiss darn your picture onto your knitting.

(Swiss darning instructions are on Blog Post 2)

 

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TO MAKE UP

  1. Sew on the boat picture before constructing the pouch.
  2. Put the blue mast up the centre line of knitting stitches – you can find these by folding your knitting in half; across and lengthways.
  3. Put the top of the flag on the 14th row down from the top of the light blue knitting (from under the top band).
  4. Sew the two sides of the pouch right sides together along the side and bottom seams using running or back stitch.
  5. Crochet 100 chains into a length of yarn of a contrasting colour (such as the red used for the boat).
  6. Pull this evenly through the ‘channel’ in the knitting leaving the ends to the side.
  7. Tie the ends of the cord together tightly – this will make a loop running through the top of the pouch. Make sure this is especially secure if you want to make a camera pouch that you will carry over your wrist.
  8. Sew any loose ends of yarn into the cord to neaten.

 

         

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Boat Motif Chart

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BLOW MY FOGHORN!!!

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PLUS

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weekend

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lt’s the Weekend!

 
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BOATS WORDSEARCH 

 

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  FERRY           STEAM SHIP                SPEED BOAT             LINER             CANOE

GALLEON        ROWING BOAT        SAILING BOAT         OIL TANKER          YACHT

 

Download PDF for Boats Wordsearch Chart

Boats Wordsearch Chart – Post 28 – Shipping

        

Answers next week…

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Please note that the material on this blog is for personal use or for use in classrooms only.

It is a copyright infringement and, therefore, illegal under international law to sell items made with these patterns.

Use of the toys and projects on all of these blogs is at your own risk.

©Christina Sinclair Designs 2008sand

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Answers to News Desk Quiz

 

  1. cabin = bedroom
  2. galley = kitchen
  3. bow = front (pointed)
  4. stern = back (flat or rounded)
  5. hull = bottom
  6. deck = floor
  7. saloon = living room
  8. bunk = bed
  9. berth = bed
  10. poop = a deck which is the roof of a cabin

 
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A ship’s steering wheel 

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Bunk beds 

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A deck chair 

These chairs are put out on deck when it is sunny but can be folded up, stacked and stowed away easily when the weather is not so nice
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  • Yvonne says:

    A lovely looking website and I love the sound effects.

    Please keep writing – your blog is very enjoyable.

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